Are Corporations People? And The Freedom Of Speech Essay

Are Corporations People? And The Freedom Of Speech Essay

Length: 823 words (2.4 double-spaced pages)

Rating: Strong Essays

Open Document

Essay Preview

Carlos Solórzano
R. Proctor
POLS 1
December 4, 2015
Are Corporations People?
The first amendment states that “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances” (law.cornell.edu). So, according to the Amendment, the freedom of speech it provides applies to “the people”. Corporations have this freedom of speech, but are corporations’ people? No they are not, thus should not have the same rights as such.
Corporations are run by the people it is true; however the corporations are truly run by its higher ups like the CEO/President. The CEO/Presidents view on a political subject does not reflect the whole group of people working for him/her in that corporation. With that being said the corp. workers can disagree on the corporation’s stance, which means its speech isn’t true, because it’s not speaking for its entirety. Just because people are needed to run a corporation, doesn’t mean that the corporation should be considered a person.
Corporations are powerful entities, much more powerful than your average citizen. With such power and money, they can dominate the electoral process by spending unlimited amounts of money to support a candidate and/or campaign. That much power can drown out the common voters vote. The Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act or BCRA is a federal law that regulates the financial support of election campaigns; this law prevents corporations, drowning out the everyday voters with provided spending limits made by the federal government (law.cornell.edu).
Court case Citizens United v. Federal Electi...


... middle of paper ...


... movement where they worked with local activist to “apprehend” corporate imposters posing as ‘people’. What they mean by that, is that they’ll interview anyone masquerading as a person, which entails interviewing a corporate logo, signs, atm machines, and intimate corporate owned objects of that sort to say that corporate personhood is ridiculous (citizen.org).
Freedom of speech is a very interesting and one of the most debated topics throughout the political world, and even daily life, what to say and what not so say at work examples of that nature. There is one thing that is fact; the first amendment says that it is the right of the people, not the right of these “nonhuman” godlike entities that exist solely to make money. Corporations have no soul, no feelings, it isn’t someone and they should not have the right to speech as they do not have the right to vote.



Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »

Corporations: Individual Profit Wthout Individual Responsibility Essay examples

- Corporations, presently, are legal citizens in the United States. This legal citizenship guarantees all Corporations many of the legal rights that natural born citizens can enjoy with limited consequences for their actions. Presently since the law sees Corporations as “artificial citizens” many of the punishments for crimes committed by a Corporation are essentially null and void since these entities cannot cordially be punished for committing a crime as a physically living human can. Firstly before delving into the complex interwoven legalities of Corporations it is imperative to know what a Corporation is and what separates it from another form of business i.e....   [tags: corporations, citizens, CEOs]

Strong Essays
1467 words (4.2 pages)

Freedom of Speech: Should We Be Spending Money to Transmit Messages?

- ... Regardless of the entity or citizen, freedom of speech should be treated the same across the board. How is it constitutionally acceptable to limit a corporation from spending money on a candidate that they feel portrays their beliefs or goals. After all, a corporation is made up of citizens of the United States and is a form of accumulated people. Donating to a cause or something that is believed in is making a statement and is protected by the constitution. An argument to consider is that a corporation is not an individual citizen, therefore, cannot be included in the constitution as having the same rights and protections that a natural citizen would have....   [tags: freedom, idea, belief, restrict]

Free Essays
535 words (1.5 pages)

Limitations Of Freedom Of Speech

- ... 20) and she further writes that there are two basic forms of responses or respect. One form of response would be evaluative respect or a form of respect given out of great respect. This respect can vary based on the opinions, feelings, or views of an individual. Since an individual 's moral compass can vary many degrees from topic, person or issue this form of respect would likely not be the best type of respect to develop a basis or decision on, moral or ethical. A better form of respect to evaluate moral or ethical issues on would be that of an evaluative respect....   [tags: Ethics, Morality, Moral psychology]

Strong Essays
1001 words (2.9 pages)

Essay about We, the Corporations, of the United States of America

- We, The Corporations, Of The United States Of America At first glance, it seems implausible the word democracy isn't written in the United States Constitution, or in the Preamble of the Constitution, or even in the Declaration of Independence. One would assume a concept so paramount to modern American culture would surely be derived from one of its oldest and most endeared documents. Alas, it is not. The Constitution only specifically mentions two entities, the government and “We the People”. Defining government is an easy enough task, but who are “We the People”....   [tags: United States Constitution, Preamble]

Strong Essays
1571 words (4.5 pages)

Essay about The Negative Effects of Censorship

- Since the foundation of the United States after a harsh split from Britain, almost 200 years later, an issue that could claim the founding grounds for the country is now being challenged by educators, high-ranking officials, and other countries. Though it is being challenged, many libertarians, democrats, and free-speech thinkers hold the claim that censorship violates our so-called unalienable rights, as it has been proven throughout many court cases. Censorship in the United States is detrimental because it has drastically and negatively altered many significant events....   [tags: democracy, freedom of speech, big brother]

Strong Essays
3203 words (9.2 pages)

Theories on the Relationship bewteen Freedom of Speech, Expression and Democracy

- Theories on the relationship between freedom of speech, expression and democracy can be critically assessed through the comparative and contrasting of Alexander Meiklejohn (1948) and Jürgen Habermas’s (1964) views in their published works. ‘The Town hall’ theory as outlined by Meiklejohn (1948, p.22) and ‘The Public Sphere’ theory as outlined by Habermas (1964, p.49) have similarities in relation to expression and democracy such as the mutual agreement they have on realizing you cannot achieve democracy unless all individuals are valued as equals....   [tags: Alexander Meiklejohn, Jurgen Habermas]

Strong Essays
1317 words (3.8 pages)

Essay about The Freedom Of The Press

- ... Sullivan. On March 29, 1960, The New York Times published the paper with an ad bought by the “Committee to Defend Martin Luther King and the Struggle for Freedom in the South” that called for people to support the civil rights movement. Even though the ad was not directed towards a specific person, City Commissioner Sullivan took it as a personal offense when he read about the ad in an editorial from a local newspaper. Because the ad talked about the how Southerners were violators of the Constitution and referred to Montgomery, the city he worked for, he sued The New York Times for libel and defamation....   [tags: First Amendment to the United States Constitution]

Strong Essays
1036 words (3 pages)

Super Freedom: More Money Less Speech

- During the 2012 republican caucus in Iowa, local television stations received a huge gift from the Supreme Court. Less than two years early the Supreme Court’s ruling in the Citizens United v. Federal Election Committee gave large corporations, labor unions, and trade associations a break through its interpretation of political spending as a form of protected free speech. Additionally the new “super” political action committees that formed following the decision allowed contributors to donate as much money as they pleased without any stringent disclosure....   [tags: Republican Caucus, Iowa, Supreme Court]

Strong Essays
1962 words (5.6 pages)

Essay about Should The Government Effectively Censor the Internet?

- ... As a democracy we should have no censorship lest we follow Chinas example and start dropping the hammer on any poor Joe who has the guts to question the government. As a democracy the government has to have the people on its side because we are the ones who give them the power to make decisions that affect all of us. But if they start to pass bills into law that allow monitoring of citizens on the web. That would allow agencies to spy on anyone because they might do something. One example of this is the recent Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act that was passed by the House of Representatives in April 2013....   [tags: reducing privacy, freedom of speech]

Strong Essays
1037 words (3 pages)

Freedom of Expression Essay

- That there are rights to which people are entitled by virtue of their humanity is not a novel idea. The statement in italic above surely has been presented throughout history as an archetype of this concept, specifically noting freedom of expression as a right to which all hold possession. The assertion of this right is well represented in the Unites States Bill of Rights. Within that document the First Amendment specifically restricts governmental powers prohibiting any such law or act from abbreviating our freedom of speech ....   [tags: U.S. Bill of Rights, Amendments]

Strong Essays
1935 words (5.5 pages)