The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn Essay

The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn Essay

Length: 1240 words (3.5 double-spaced pages)

Rating: Strong Essays

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The book The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn tell the tale of a young boy who embarks on an adventure, one that leads him to find himself. Throughout the novel Huck develops a sense of morality that was always there to begin with, but not nearly as developed as it is by the end of the novel. Through living on his own, independent of societal and peer pressures, Huck is able to identify his own morals in defining what is 'right ' or 'wrong '.
Originally, Huck Finn lacks an individual sense of moral sensibility. His is instead influenced by those around him, like his friends, family, and school. Huck thinks to himself, “Pretty soon I wanted to smoke, and asked the widow to let me. But she wouldn’t. She said it was a mean practice and wasn’t clean… That is just the way with some people...” (pg.10), giving us insight into his own individual sense of morals, because even though an adult figure is advising him of what to do, he is skeptical of them and goes against their opinion. This may also convey the importance of parental figures in books, as Huck is lacking a mother, and so Widow Douglass acts as one. Huck says “that is just the way with some people”, as though he were older and experienced talking to all different kinds of people about what was wrong and what was good, further proving that he does not care for adults to tell him what he can and cannot do.
When Huck is living with his dad, he slowly begins to develop his own thoughts in relation to what is good and bad based on the things that his dad does, along with the free time he has being locked up at home. As Huck is faking his death, he declares to himself, “They won’t ever hunt the river for anything but my dead carcass. They’ll soon get tired of that, and won’t bother n...


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...we see that Huck has really become dormant in his own thinking, and seeks to know what others like Tom think. Interestingly, by the end of the novel he has become somewhat submissive and willing to listen to what he is told to do, but still with an overall heightened sense of morality that developed throughout his adventures.
It’s natural for humans to forget about finding our own opinions, especially when surrounding by people who tell them what they should think and what is good for them or bad for them. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn conveys this idea even further, showing how a young boy living alone learns what he truly believes in, regardless of what he was raised to believe. As presidential elections come around, Huck Finn may inspire us all to tune in with our own opinions, and tune out the media and peer pressure on whose policies we agree with the most.

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The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn Essay

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